Feature

The Ten-Minute Interview: Andrea E. Davis, RCIS, FSICP, Washington, D.C.

A snapshot of one cardiac cath lab professional's experiences, ideas and work

A snapshot of one cardiac cath lab professional's experiences, ideas and work

Why did you choose to work in the invasive cardiology field? I started working in the Cardiac Cath Lab after working in the Coronary Intensive Care Unit. While working in CCU, part of my responsibilities was to follow my patient to the cath lab to assist the cath lab team if need be. I wanted to be part of that team. The attraction of the team was how they worked in concert, almost as one unit. They anticipated the physician movements, along with the needs and condition of the patient. The thing that I find most appealing about the CV lab environment is the camaraderie. Individuals who are naturally drawn to work in the lab are usually intelligent, dedicated, passionate professionals. We work hard, but we play hard also. What is the most bizarre case you have ever been involved in? Well, this not only was bizarre, but funny in a way. A young man was admitted to the Emergency Room with an A/V fistula in the femoral vasculature. When he was transferred up to the cath lab, the full story unfolded. His girlfriend had caught him in a VERY compromising position. She then proceeded to shoot him, hoping to damage, let’s say, his family jewels, but the path of the bullet actually caused this A/V fistula. We proceeded with a coil embolization procedure to seal off the fistula. Meanwhile, this same girlfriend needed consolation and a brown bag secondary to hyperventilation in the waiting room area. True love… Where do you see yourself professionally when it is time to retire? Well, I have trouble quieting my mind. Most times, I see myself on parallel tracks. Maybe with a company involved with development of products, devices or pharmaceuticals. At the same time, I see myself continuing in the support and advancement of our profession. So in essence, maybe I’ll slow down a little, but not totally stop. Why did you choose to get involved with the Society of Invasive Cardiovascular Professionals (SICP)? Back in the early 1990s while working in Washington, D.C., I became aware of the SICP organization through association with Chris Nelson and Brad Ferguson. I knew about other professional groups and back then, we were all referred to as CPTs or RCVTs. Some of us worked in the cath lab, some in the pulmonary lab, blood gas lab, etc. The SICP seemed to embrace ALL groups and try to bring them together, under one banner. Numbers do make the difference. The nursing organizations have respect and recognition because they are organized and they have membership numbers. Can you describe your role with the SICP? Well, my role as Electronic Editor for the SICP section in Cath Lab Digest is to contribute to the editorial responsibilities. I review submissions for publication, and write updates from conferences, annual scientific meetings etc. I also review websites and notify the membership of informative links. Your work for the SICP is volunteer. What motivates you to continue? Once you have the exposure of working in the CV lab environment you will always have a level of loyalty and respect for that position. I believe you have to stay involved. Though I work in industry now, I have an alliance with the profession. What is the biggest challenge you see regarding your role with the SICP? The organization’s continued growth, and keeping the autonomy of the profession. I don’t want to see the CV credential go unrecognized or absorbed into another professional entity. If you could send a message back to yourself at the beginning of your cath lab career, what advice would you give? RELAX… The cath lab is like a locomotive. It has a route just get on and enjoy the ride. Remember, don’t let anyone steal your joy. Are there any websites or texts you would recommend to other labs? Heart Failure Society http://www.hfsa.org/ Free Software (Devices) http://www.qsrhelp.com/freedls.shtmlhol American Health Consultants http://www.ahcpub.com/ahc_root_html/products/newsletters/cdu.html Cardiotech International This site is of interest to those who want to know about materials used in making different products (catheters & devices) used routinely in the CV Lab and Special Procedures Lab. http://www.cardiotech-inc.com/ What changes do you think will occur in the field of cardiology in the coming decades? Procedures will be done on an outpatient basis, with a higher utilization of 23-hour units to facilitate it. More combination procedures, such as MRI and CT assisted. An increased need to bring educational options to employees rather than have them take time and resources from the work environment to attend conferences. In other words, I see many more educational opportunities offered via the Internet.

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